User Tools

Site Tools


ssh

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
ssh [2017/05/19 20:42]
deul
ssh [2019/05/06 09:16] (current)
jansen remove references to authorized_keys2, add section for local use with shared home directory
Line 55: Line 55:
  
 The file identity.pub contains your public key, which can be added to other system'​s authorized keys files. The file identity.pub contains your public key, which can be added to other system'​s authorized keys files.
 +
 +====Simplified version in case of a shared home disk====
 +This is how you authorize the key for use within a local network with shared home disk. See below for the general case of accessing a remote system.
 +
 +Simply add the public part of the key to your .ssh/​authorized_keys file, and make sure that that file is not accessible for others:
 +  cat ~/​.ssh/​id_dsa.pub >> ~/​.ssh/​authorized_keys
 +  chmod 600 ~/​.ssh/​authorized_keys
 +
  
 ====Copy public key to server==== ====Copy public key to server====
Line 66: Line 74:
   id_dsa.pub ​   100% |*****************************************************| ​  ​526 ​      00:00   id_dsa.pub ​   100% |*****************************************************| ​  ​526 ​      00:00
  
-This will place your keys in your home directory on the remote server. After that we will login on the remote server using ssh or telnet ​the conventional way... with a password.+This will place your keys in your home directory on the remote server. After that we will login on the remote server using ssh the conventional way... with a password.
  
-When you are logged in you should create a .ssh directory, and inside the .ssh/ directory create an authorized_keys ​and an authorized_keys2 ​file and add the keys to the files. Make sure the files are not readable for other users/​groups. chmod 600 authorized_keysdoes the trick.+When you are logged in you should create a .ssh directory, and inside the .ssh/ directory create an authorized_keys file and add the keys to the file. Make sure the files are not readable for other users/​groups. chmod 600 authorized_keys does the trick.
  
-Placing the key for version 2 works as follows:+Placing the key works as follows:
  
   $ cd .ssh   $ cd .ssh
-  $ touch authorized_keys2 +  $ touch authorized_keys 
-  $ chmod 600 authorized_keys2 +  $ chmod 600 authorized_keys 
-  $ cat ../​id_dsa.pub >> ​authorized_keys2+  $ cat ../​id_dsa.pub >> ​authorized_keys
   $ rm ../​id_dsa.pub   $ rm ../​id_dsa.pub
  
 From now on you can login from client yyyy to server zzzz without having to specify a password. From now on you can login from client yyyy to server zzzz without having to specify a password.
  
ssh.txt · Last modified: 2019/05/06 09:16 by jansen